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How to “Win” an RFP/ITB

How to “Win” an RFP/ITB

Tips for Attending the Pre--Proposal Conference

  • READ the entire RFP before arriving (that’s why it was mailed to you 7-10 days before the meeting).
  • Bring your copy of the RFP with you.
  • Bring your written comments/suggestions for changes with you.
  • Feel free to ask questions.
  • If you have concerns about the RFP/contract (Terms & Conditions, Scope of Work, Insurance Requirements, or Selection Criteria), let us know immediately.
  • Bring business cards with you.

Tips for Getting Your Submittal Short--listed

  • READ the RFP and follow all instructions.
  • Have all contents in the recommended/required order.
  • Use tabs to make it easy for the Evaluation Team to find what they’re looking for.
  • If financial statements are required, include them behind the appropriate tab in each of the binders – do not include them in a separate envelope with a notation such as “do not copy”.
  • Include comparable previous experience (in the same $ range / square footage range).
  • Submit it on time – do not “overnight” it the day before, leave early if you are delivering it personally. All late proposals will be rejected.
  • Don’t take exception to items in the sample contract. You should have made your concerns known before the due date, so that appropriate changes could have been made for all proposers.
  • Use graphs to show availability of personnel and other data.
  • List previous projects – indicating scheduled completion dates vs. actual completion dates, and initial contract $ vs. final contract $, even if not asked to do so in the RFP.
  • Don’t exaggerate.
  • Include letters of recommendation, even if not requested in the RFP.
  • Include projects that were completed by the project team that will be assigned to this project.
  • If there is a “maximum number of pages”, do not violate this rule – any pages past the specified number will not be considered, and this may cause your proposal to become non-responsive.
  • NOTE: If your proposal does not comply with any mandatory requirement, your proposal will be rejected.
  • Call the Contact Person if you have any questions. Technical questions should be submitted in writing via EMail or fax. Call to ensure they are received.

Tips for Being Ranked #1 for Your Oral Presentation

  • Don’t repeat what’s in your book – they’ve already read it – that’s why you were short- listed.
  • Don’t talk too much about previous projects – talk about THIS project.
  • Tell the Evaluation Team what you will “do for the College” – how you will ensure that this project is completed on-time and on-budget.
  • Inform the Evaluation Team of alternate solutions/ways to complete this project.
  • Do your homework. Learn about the project Owner (the College).
  • Be sure your project manager attends, and is the lead speaker. Don’t bring personnel who aren’t on the agenda, or who will not be involved in the project. Each person attending should speak about the tasks they will perform on this project.
  • Use multi- media, i.e.; PowerPoint, handouts, video.
  • Use graphs to show that your project team is available to start/complete this project.
  • You may briefly refer to another project you did, but keep it pertinent and brief – talk about THIS project. Exception: Mention how you helped clients save $.
  • Tell the Evaluation Team about your resources, such as your website – how it can be used to get pertinent, up-to-date information on this project.
  • Tell the Evaluation Team why you want this job, and that you look forward to working with them.
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